Shepherd's Green Sanctuary



    welcome  to our site

    A place for information and resources for pigs in private homes, shelters, sanctuaries and zoos. Compassionate solutions to the desperate needs of the unwanted and abused.
    Learn about caring for the pigs in your life, seek assistance for a pig in need of a vet or a new home, find resources on Abuse laws, State and Federal health regulations, locate where to buy and how to build... or simply sit back and enjoy the photographic tours of our beautiful Tennessee hills and valleys and the residents who live here in peace.

Our Mission
Shepherd's Green Sanctuary exists to provide rescue, lifetime care and other aid and assistance to abandoned, abused, neglected, homeless and otherwise endangered pigs

Shepherd's Green Sanctuary *** 139 Copeland Lane *** Cookeville, TN 38506

  email:                                                                                                                                          931-498-5540 phone

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Copyright (c) 2009 Shepherd's Green Sanctuary   All Rights reserved





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Pig Care



Everything I need to know is right here.. somewhere !




Vet School Locator

Supporting the Sanctuary

 Easy ways to generate funds every day without writing a check

Check out the many ways including:


View newsletters from 2009 forward


Tour the sanctuary



"I want a pig!"  A quick list to see if your home is pig ready

Click here to read and enjoy the


a pig's eye view of life with humans. Having a pig (or a pig having you) is nothing like keeping a pooch or a kitty in your home!


Pigs In the News

Agility Pig

Pig Christmas

The  2014 celebration.






About Shepherd's  Green



Join Our Mission by speaking out against the breeding of these miniature pigs!


     All of the pigs marketed today are from the same genetic stock as the first ones imported in 1985. I have been with them since they arrived and watched in horror as little pigs like Fate (pictured right) were deliberatley starved almost to death.. and many others not so lucky died of starvation and mutation disorders.  Great Britain outlawed the false marketing of any miniature pig. The ad that says the pig will stay 20 pounds is not telling you the true story.

    Don't be fooled by a change in the name. Whether its called Teacup or mico or vietnamese pot belly or pocket pig.. it will grow to its potential if given good care. It will be sickly and suffer endlessly if not fed correctly and given a healthy environment.

   Use your head.. an animal whose potential adult size is 130 pounds to 160 pounds cannot be healthy or ever feel full on a half cup of feed. That is pure and simple abuse in anybody's language. If a breeder or adopter tells you to keep the pig small by feeding it any less that you would feed a teenage child in your home, punch them!!! These greedy people who want to cash in on your ignorance are getting rich while the pigs suffer and die.

   Piglets can eat huge quantities of feed (and should!!) and burn every bite off in high energy outdoor play. Its those formative years that define future wellness in all nutrional areas.. feed them the best food and plenty of it.

    If you are thinking of buying or adopting, contact a sanctuary who has been living with the results of the fad for decades.. they will give you the information you need to make an informed decision. Ironwood, Galastar, Pigpals NC, Planet Pig, Rooterville.. ask.. don't let yourself become part of the suffering.

This is a "teacup" pig who sold for $600 in the Knoxville area..  She is a sweet pig who limped due to a serious bone plate growth abnormality so she was "dumped"  ( she outgrew the growth problem and is fine today.). She is now a comfortable 140 pounds, a good weight for her frame.




Click here to Support Our Daily Work

by making a donation


Join our Helping Hoof subscribers to Save the Babes, like these saved in Feb.

Helping Hoof



potbellies are considered by many to be the most abused animal in the U.S. today

Read more