USDA Regulations

The website for the USDA contains entire universes of useful and other information.

Regulations set down by the USDA regarding animal welfare are as binding as law and have about the same history of variable enforcement. It will take time and a lot of positive interaction between animal friendly groups and regulatory groups to make any real headway to be made for those who are most committed (the animals).Get to know your USDA agents and help pave the way with positive conversations and by abiding by the current regulations.

The first of many such regulations about pigs (whether they be pets or livestock, they don't differentiate), is that of transportation and identification. While NAIS has not yet become a widespread practice and has been fought by farmers and ranchers everywhere, it has been quietly written into the regulations.

Whether you are taking your pet pig to visit your Aunt Belle in Maine or just across the line to a pig gathering,  the rules are the same. Failure to abide by them can cause your pig(s) to be at risk. [Potbellies are grouped in with"Breeding swine" no matter if they are spayed or neutered.]

Federal level Swine Monitoring .

To ascertain the exact rules for transporting a pig into your state, you need to search for:    USDA (your state)  transportation regulations  

Below are those for Tennessee.  

0080-2-1-.07 SWINE.

(1) Breeding and Feeding Swine

(a) Breeding and feeding swine, transported into or through the State of Tennessee shall be:

1. Individually identified to the farm of origin by an official coded metal eartag or other approved means; and

2. Accompanied by an official health certificate; and

3. Maintained under quarantine, on one premise where first unloaded, isolated from all other swine for thirty (30) days from the date of entry.

(b) Additional Requirements for Breeding Swine.

1. Brucellosis:

(i) Breeding swine, four (4) months of age and older shall be accompanied by evidence of a negative official test for brucellosis conducted not more than thirty (30) days prior to the date of entry, or

(ii) Originate directly from a Validated Brucellosis-Free Heard. The health certificate shall list the herd validation number, or

(iii) Originate directly from a Validated Brucellosis-Free State. See table at bottom of page

2. Pseudorabies: December, 2006 (Revised) 10

HEALTH REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION AND CHAPTER-0080-2-1

TRANSPORTATION OF LIVESTOCK AND POULTRY

(Rule 0080-2-1-.07, continued)

(i) Breeding swine four (4) months of age and older shall be accompanied by evidence of a negative official test for pesudorabies conducted not more than thirty (30) days prior to entry, and evidence of origin from a herd not known to have been infected with pseudorabies for at least twelve (12) months immediately prior to entry, or

(ii) Originate directly from a “Qualified Pseudorabies Negative” herd. The health certificate shall list the qualified Pseudorabies negative herd, or

(iii) Originate directly from a herd in a Stage V, (Pseudorabies Free) State     See table at bottom of page

(iv) Pseudorabies vaccinated swine or swine originating from quarantined herds, shall not be imported.

3. Quarantine and retest required:

(i) All breeding swine entering the state shall be maintained under quarantine on one premises where first unloaded, isolated from all other swine and

(ii) Retested for pseudorabies not less than thirty (30) days nor more than sixty (60) days after arrival.

(c) Additional Requirements for Feeder Swine.

1. Feeder swine imported and shipped to approved premises of licensed feeder pig dealers for assembly and reshipment may be exempt from the thirty (30) day quarantine provided such swine are:

(i) Maintained as a group properly and individually identified to the state and farm of origin;

(ii) Reshipped within seventy-two (72) hours after arrival.

2. Feeder swine originating directly from a single farm of origin, shipped by the producer or his agent directly to a Tennessee farm premises for feeding to a finished weight prior to slaughter may be imported into Tennessee without the required individual identification provided they otherwise meet the requirements as set forth herein.

3. Pseudorabies:

(i) Feeder swine imported into the state must originate from a pseudorabies-monitored feeder pig herd or

(ii) Originate from a herd in a Pseudorabies Stage III, IV, V State, or

(iii) must be tested negative to Pseudorabies within thirty (30) days prior to entry.

(d) No breeding or feeding swine shall be imported from any state where hog cholera, African swine fever, or other foreign swine diseases are known to exist, or any portion of the state is under state or federal quarantine because of such diseases, except by permission of the Tennessee State Veterinarian.

(2) Slaughter Swine

December, 2006 (Revised) 11

HEALTH REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION AND CHAPTER-0080-2-1

TRANSPORTATION OF LIVESTOCK AND POULTRY

(Rule 0080-2-1-.07, continued)

(a) Slaughter swine transported into or through the State of Tennessee shall be accompanied by a “transportation document.’’ Except, this requirement shall not apply to such swine moved directly from a farm of origin by the producer or his agent.

(b) No slaughter swine shall be imported from any area where swine are under a state or federal quarantine except by the permission of the Tennessee State Veterinarian.

(3) Exhibition Swine-Same as Breeding Swine Except:

(a) Feeding and breeding swine are exempted from the thirty (30) day quarantine.

(b) Barrows are exempt from brucellosis testing.

(c) Swine entered in events where all swine on the promises will be consigned to slaughter upon leaving the event are exempt from brucellosis and pseudorabies testing.

Authority: T.C.A. §§4-3-203 and 44-2-102. Administrative History: Original rule certified June 4, 1974. Repeal by Public Chapter 261. New rule filed June 20, 1983; effective July 20, 1983. Amendment filed November 1, 1986; effective December 25, 1986. Amendment filed September 14, 1999; effective January 28, 2000.

The charts below from the USDA Aphis records show that the country is essentially free of the two regulatory diseases upon which all the regulations rest. Except for Texas (being very involved in shipping hogs to and from Mexico for slaughter) and the residual problems in wild pigs, especially in Florida and Georgia (not part of this reporting), there is no problem. However, comforting as that is, the rules prevail. If you are required by some state vet to test your pig for travel, be sure to let your vet do it. We know of several killed  from mishandling by individuals who are not familiar with the Potbellied pig's stress issues.